Contents

The 4 Best Walkie Talkies For Hunting — Reviews 2020 Photo by m01229 / CC BY Walkie talkies have almost become as commonplace as cell phones, maybe because cell phones also have their own set of limitations. But where these limitations end, the walkie talkie begins. Also known as two way radios, walkie talkies operate like cell phones in that they can receive and send signals through the air.

The 4 Best Walkie Talkies For Hunting — Reviews 2020 Photo by m01229 / CC BY Walkie talkies have almost become as commonplace as cell phones, maybe because cell phones also have their own set of limitations. But where these limitations end, the walkie talkie begins. Also known as two way radios, walkie talkies operate like cell phones in that they can receive and send signals through the air. But unlike a cell phone, walkie talkies do not quire a tower in order to function, so you can use them wherever and whenever you want. It is for this reason that walkie talkies have become enormously popular among hunters, to the point that radio manufacturers are now making walkie talkies designed specifically to the needs of hunters. Whenever you see camouflage colored walkie talkies at the store, they are likely ones that have been built to the needs of a hunter. The issue isn’t in finding a walkie talkie designed for hunting; it’s in choosing the right one out of the several that are on the market! Here are, in our opinion, the 4 best walkie talkies for hunting on the market: Midland GXT1050VP4 Midland GXT1050VP4 50 Channel GMRS Two-Way Radio - Up to 36 Mile Range Walkie Talkie - Mossy Oak Camo (Pair Pack) Price: $74.99 Price as of 08/14/2020 04:06 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. When you see a walkie talkie covered with a mossy oak color, you can only assume that it’s made specifically for hunters. In this case, you would made the right assumption. The GXT1050VP4 from Midland can provide you with a longer range than the Talkabout from Motorola, and also comes equipped with weather updates and alerts. Plus, it’s powered by the most common and some of the most cheapest batteries available: AA. This should be on any list of the best walkie talkies for hunting . Midland GXT1050 Two Way Radio Watch this video on YouTube

Best 22 Pistols For Self Defense 2020 Ultimate Review

Best 22 Pistols For Self Defense  2020 Ultimate Review

If you are looking for a 22 pistol for the purpose of self-defense, then you would be well advised to select one that is high-quality and reliable. The .22 caliber is perhaps one of the most trusted and reliable rounds for those who conceal carry for the purpose of self-defense. Some users are even able to keep these pistols at home and carry another pistol instead. Regardless, they have their bases covered when it comes to preparing themselves for dangerous situations. Since there are numerous .22 pistols for self-defense that exist on the market, we have tracked down only the best so you are not so overwhelmed with options. ​ Before we unveil the list, we’ll talk about how accurate these pistols are, along with some things you need to look out for in an effort to choose the best firearm for yourself. At a Glance: Our Top Picks for 22 Pistols For Self Defense OUR TOP PICK: Walther Arms Inc P22 Target Ruger SR22 BEST BUDGET OPTION: Smith & Wesson M&P22 Compact Walther Arms Colt Government 1911 A1 Smith & Wesson 617 Handgun Comparison Chart of the Best .22 Pistols "For Self Defense" PRODUCT Our Top Pick Our Top Pick Walther Arms Inc P22 Target Capacity of 10 + 1 rounds Includes a .22 long rifle magazine Best overall .22 pistol for self-defense View Latest Price Ruger SR22 Contains 10+1 rounds Adjustable sights included Runner-up for best overall .22 pistol for self-defense "View Latest Price" Best Budget Option "Best Budget Option" Smith & Wesson M&P22 Compact Best .22 pistol for the money Removable magazine included Double magazines with 10 rounds each View Latest Price Walther Arms "Colt Government 1911" A1 12-round capacity Built for 22LR cartridges Fixed two-dot sight included View Latest Price Smith & Wesson 617 Handgun Synthetic grip 10-round capacity Single and Double Action View Latest Price How Accurate is a .22 Pistol? This will depend on the type of pistol that you use. The accuracy may differ based on certain models, but you can be certain that you’ll be able to hit a target with effective accuracy when the distance is about 50 yards or thereabouts. Some may go a shorter distance and some may go farther. Also, shooting groups may also vary depending on the type of ammo that you use. How to Choose a .22 Pistol It’s not wise to choose a .22 pistol at complete random without knowing what to look for. You deserve the best value and quality so you are not spending money on anything disappointing. If you need a .22 pistol for self-defense, here are some of the things to keep your eyes peeled for: Price First off, we’ll talk about price. The price tag is probably going to play a minimal role in deciding which pistol is right for you. If you are on a budget, you’ll need to invest in the best quality and performance that you can afford. If it’s too low of a price, then it would be wise to exercise caution. Low, cheap prices will almost always lead to poor quality and performance. Source Concealed Carry or Keep it at Home .22 pistols come in several different sizes. Some of them will be appropriate for concealed carry and some will only be appropriate for keeping at home. If you feel comfortable carrying a full-sized .22 pistol, you should be able to find a holster for such a purpose. Consider the measurements of the pistols that you are looking at for whatever purpose so you can determine if they are worth carrying in a holster or keeping in your dresser drawer. Reliability Reliability is a definite plus when it comes to finding a self-defense pistol, especially when you need something that will work to your advantage the most. The last thing you need is a pistol that will malfunction or jam on you when life is on the line. Be sure to keep in the loop of what people are saying about the reliability of your pistol of choice. Quick Take - The Best .22 Pistols For Self Defense These are our recommendations for the best .22 pistols for self defense: Walther Arms Inc P22 Target Ruger SR22 Smith & Wesson M&P22 Compact Review of the Best .22 Pistols For Self-Defense Below is our list of the .22 pistols for self-defense that are currently the best on the market. As you read through the list, be sure to pay attention to the most attractive characteristics and features so you can find a pistol that closely matches the description of what you are looking for in a pistol. Remember, close enough is a whole lot better than nothing at all. Let’s begin by taking a look at the “best overall” choice for .22 self-defense pistols: Best Overall: Walther Arms Inc P22 Target CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Durable and solid construction Reliable shooting each and every time Rear sight allows for precise accurate shooting Excellent for concealed carry and home defense Grip is super solid and allows for superior gripping in bad weather Cons None What Recent Buyers Report A lot of new users were quite happy with this pistol for a few good reasons. For one, they loved the overall reliability of it. They can pull the trigger and can get their shots off rather quickly. Also, the gripping ability for those dealing with sweaty palms or even wet weather was, as one user described it, “ridiculously strong”. He said that he can get an excellent grip on it and not worry about it slipping out of his hands. Why it Stands Out to Us This target pistol is easily one of the most solid and ruggedly built pistols on the market. Make no mistake, it’s durable and can handle round after round of shooting. You can fire well over 100 rounds and it will still hold up strong with no malfunctions or jamming issues. This is exactly what you need in a pistol that is worthy of concealed carry and self-defense. With almost 11 rounds at your disposal, you’ll be prepared to defend yourself against attackers and prowlers. Sometimes, it only takes a few to knock them down. If you want a pistol that is well-deserving of the “best overall” title, then you will certainly get a good one with this .22. Who Will Use This Most This would be a perfect pistol for those who intend to either concealed carry or keep it at home. Yes, it’s at the right size for concealed carry. But it can stand out as that pistol that you can discreetly keep in a locked drawer. It’s solidly built and will, in turn, give you the best reliability possible. If you want a pistol that will work right when you need it the most, this might be right up your alley. Bottom Line The Walther Arms P22 Target pistol deserves its spot on the top of our list and proves that it can stand out as the go-to choice for concealed carry and home defense users. If you want something that will be useful to you in the years that follow, you won’t find any other pistol quite like it. As long as you take good care of this pistol, it will certainly take care of you in the direst of survival situations. Runner-up: ​ Ruger SR22 CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Great for concealed carry Reliable; doesn’t jam or malfunction Superior quality; really durable build Light in weight, even when fully loaded Functions with different types of ammo Cons May be a challenge to load at times May be difficult to disassemble for maintenance or cleaning Accuracy could be better; it can be effective at about 25 yards out, but nothing more "What Recent Buyers" Report A lot of new users found this pistol to be really decent in terms of accuracy. Meanwhile, they were even more impressed with the overall quality and reliability. One user said that he uses this for target practice most of the time, but also utilizes it as a concealed carry pistol in case he ends up in a potentially dangerous situation. So far, he says he’s got no complaints about the overall functionality or quality. Why it Stands Out to Us This pistol is ridiculously lightweight when it’s not loaded. It’s also ridiculously lightweight when it is loaded. So, when you put this on a holster, you won’t feel it weigh down on you. The last thing you need is dealing with a heavy pistol, which may affect your handling and overall use. Since it’s lightweight, it’s easy and natural to conceal carry it in a nice, reliable holster. Load this up with your favorite .22 ammo and you’ll be good to go in terms of jam-free shooting and tight shooting groups. If accuracy is what you look for in a self-defense pistol, you’ll get that out of this. Even if it’s at a short distance, it’s still effective. Who Will "Use This Most" This would make a great starter pistol for those starting out with concealed carry or using a pistol for self-defense. It’s light in carrying weight and it definitely has a decent trigger pull that is neither too light or too heavy. Just apply the pressure and you’ll get a shot or two off quickly. If you want a .22 that will be reliable and provide a good deal of stopping power, this might be a pistol that’s worth looking at a bit closer. Bottom Line The Ruger SR22 is a pistol that will certainly be one of the best-concealed carry pistols for newbies . You’re definitely going to love it once you get a good number of test shots out at the range, and your confidence will be better knowing that you are prepared for any danger that may lurk around the corner. Best for the Money: Smith & Wesson M&P22 Compact CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Affordable for most budgets Great for concealed carry and self-defense Grip is excellent in bad weather conditions Super reliable shooting; no malfunctions to report Accurate and precise shooting at various distances Cons None What Recent Buyers Report This pistol was a hit with most users who were looking for something that was affordable and newbie-friendly. Sure enough, they were not disappointed to come across this budget-friendly pistol . They were impressed with the size and were able to use it for the purpose of concealed carry. One user said that once it fits in his holster, it didn’t bulge underneath his shirt, making concealed carrying his pistol a lot more comfortable. Why it Stands Out to Us If you are looking for a compact-sized pistol, this is one of those .22 pistols that will be exceptional for concealed carry purposes. It’s lightweight (loaded or unloaded) and will make sure that you get the best concealability possible when it’s placed in a holster. You will be quite prepared to take on any attackers or prowlers that are stupid enough to mess with someone that conceal carries a pistol. If you want a pistol that won’t weigh you down or bulge to the point where people are beginning to wonder if you are carrying something, this is the one you’ll want in your arsenal. Who Will Use This Most If you want a pistol that will be easy for concealed carry and make preparing for any survival situation much easier than ever, this will be a .22 that will definitely give you the benefits of being well protected. Just slip this into your holster and you’ll have peace of mind knowing that you are ready to draw it if and when you are threatened. Bottom Line The Smith &; Wesson M&P22 Compact is the real deal. Even at a price that is affordable for most, it will certainly be the best option for many new concealed carry users starting out. It’s reliable, solid, and will last you years down the road. Don’t be shocked if this bad boy is as effective as, if not better than any other pistol you have used. 4. Walther Arms Colt Government 1911 A1 CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Excellent velocity Durability is solid Superior reliability Excellent for self-defense Perfect for law enforcement and military personnel Cons None What Recent Buyers Report Most new buyers were really happy with the Colt Government 1911. A lot of them were law enforcement officers that were looking for something solid and reliable for their tactical and even personal concealed carry applications. This pistol definitely fit the bill in those regards. One user said that after firing well over 50 rounds, he said that the pistol remained reliable and malfunction free. Plus, accuracy was excellent as it managed to hit targets dead on from about 30 yards out. Why it Stands Out to Us This superb firarm has long been the standard firearm of choice for many US government agents and military members. That was until they switched over to a version of SIG Sauer pistols. But without question, the Colt Government 1911 is considered to be one of the most reliable pistols on the market. If the government can trust them for that alone, so should you, particularly if reliability is important to you. Also, accuracy is super sharp and will be deadly in self-defense situations. All it takes is one well placed shot to get the job done. If accuracy and precision are what you want, you get it with this. Who Will Use This Most If you want the best in reliability for a .22 pistol, then you’re going to want this bad boy all to yourself. Try it out at the range and fire at least 100 rounds. It’s a guarantee that no malfunctions will happen at all (if they do, then that’s a rare occurrence). Reliability matters in a self-defense pistol. And this one will certainly save your life in self-defense applications. If you need a good EDC pistol, you’d be hard-pressed to find anything this reliable anywhere else. Bottom Line "The Walther Arms" Colt Government 1911 A1 is no doubt one of the best .22 caliber pistols out there in terms of reliability. There are a handful of other .22 pistols out there that could give this a run for its money, but if you want a pistol that will certainly give you a jam-free performance, this might be right up your alley. 5. Smith & Wesson 617 Handgun CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Accurate and precise Easy to load, takes a few minutes Simple to shoot in single-action mode Reliable and malfunction-free shooting Excellent for concealed carry and home defense Cons May be a little loud for some users Cylinder may be difficult to pull out at first Trigger pull may be difficult in double-action mode What Recent Buyers Report Many new users say that this pistol was reliable and easy to shoot in single-action mode (since it provided them the quickest opportunity to knock down assailants and prowlers). They said that the synthetic grip allowed for excellent handling even in bad weather or while their palms were sweating. While testing it out at the range, one user said that he was still able to hold the pistol firmly despite his hands getting wet from the rain (and he forgot his shooting gloves at the range as well). Why it Stands Out to Us This pistol has both single and double action abilities. This means that you can pull the trigger without cocking the hammer back if you so choose. If you want to cock the hammer back and shoot, you can do that as well. Regardless, you can use this to your advantage if and when you need it most. Smith and Wesson pistols are known for providing superior reliability and will continue doing so even after firing 100 rounds or more. Plus, it’s built like a brick house and is perhaps one of the best quality pistols you can find anywhere. If you want something that is built to last and will not forsake you in your times of need (i.e. self-defense), you’ll have 10 shots at your disposal to ensure that your attacker may be knocked down and forced to think twice before messing with you ever again. Who Will Use This Most If you hold reliability to a high standard, then you will probably consider this pistol as a finalist on your shortlist of choices. Even if you prefer single action to double action, it’s the pistol that will allow you plenty of time and give you an advantage over your assailant. For a .22 caliber, it’s got some powerful shooting that can deal substantial damage. Bottom Line "The Smith &" ; Wesson 617 Handgun is arguably one of the most reliable .22 pistols that you can find just about anywhere on the market. It won’t jam on you nor will it fail you at the worst possible times. Not only that, S&W pistols are best known for their reliability period. With a name like Smith and Wesson, you know it will be one of the best pistols, period. Benefits of Investing in a Quality 22 Pistol for Self Defense Knowing what you can get out of a quality .22 pistol is important. It will also give you more reasons to purchase one for yourself. Consider the following benefits below so you know what to expect if and when you choose to invest in one: Excellent Concealability Most .22 pistols are measured at the right size for concealability. All you have to do is find a pistol that will make sure that it stays concealable and won’t cause any undue attention or make those around you uncomfortable. Yes, it is required to wear a holster for concealed carry, but you need one that will fit your pistol perfectly without any wiggling or slippage. Superior Stopping Power No, it doesn’t do serious damage like some calibers. But it’s enough to stop an assailant in their tracks. Even at the velocity a .22 round typically travels, it can still be enough to leave a nasty wound depending on where you shoot. These .22 rounds are not weak by any stretch of the imagination. But one well-placed shot can be a real difference-maker compared to other calibers. Affordable Ammo If you need a caliber that has a wide variety of ammo that is affordable, then you may want to consider a .22 pistol. Yes, they are affordable compared to other calibers and will be beneficial to those on a budget as well. Some of the higher end ammo will be more affordable compared to even some mid-grade ammo for other calibers like the .45 . Conclusion If you need a really good pistol for the purpose of self-defense, a .22 might be one of the best places to start. Find one that you will keep around at home or while you are out and about. Your life is important (and so are the lives of the ones you love most). You need a pistol that will stand up to any assailant that dares to threaten you in a way, and a .22 can stop an assailant cold in their tracks. Just find the right pistol and you will be more prepared for any danger that might be just around the corner. People Also Ask Below are frequently asked questions that you can use to help better understand how .22 pistols work and whether or not they are the real deal when it comes to self-defense. Use the answers below as a guide so you are well-informed and can easily make a decision. Is a 22 Pistol Deadly? Short answer: yes. In fact, they can be just as deadly as any other caliber. It will also depend on the placement of the shot as well. A .22 will do enough damage to vital organs to the point where your attacker could be incapacitated or killed. Are 22 Pistols Good For Self-Defense? Yes, they are. They are not only perfect for self-defense due to the stopping power alone, but are also concealable for the most part. It will also depend on the kind of rounds you use for such a purpose.

Video: Breaking in a New Holster Through Blocking

Video: Breaking in a New Holster Through Blocking

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d739245b_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d739245b_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Related GunDigest Articles Optics-Friendly Galco BlakGuard Holster Introduced Video: New Champion Target Reactive Targets Video: Disaster Preparedness Card Trick Gun leather can be a stubborn thing. Stiff and tight, a new holster can impede a smooth draw and be equally as tricky on a clean re-holster. But a method called blocking can make breaking in a holster a snap. Mike Barham from Galco International gives a great quick tip on how to break in a new holster in a few spare minutes of time, through a method called blocking.

How To: 4 Easy Glock Upgrades Anyone Can Do

How To: 4 Easy Glock Upgrades Anyone Can Do

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d615bc22_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d615bc22_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } After fitting the sides of the hood, fit the front edge of the barrel locking surface until the barrel locks up into battery. While a box stock Glock will run like a champ right out of the box, these four Glock upgrades will make yours even more accurate and shootable. Four must-have Glock upgrades: Bar-Sto Precision Glock Barrel Upgraded Sights Trigger Upgrades Grip Upgrades The Glock pistol made its debut in 1982. Since that time, it has become one of the most popular handguns in the world. Some people love ‘em, and some people hate ’em, but either way, the pistol has some very good features that make it an effective handgun for self-defense, offensive tactical operations, and competition. I purchased my Glock in the late 1980s, and I’ve had quite a bit of fun with it in USPSA, IDPA, and many informal practical matches. Since that time, I’ve added a few items to it to enhance the pistol and make it more personal and “shootable,” a word which means different things to different people. In my case, one of the first items I added was the superb Bar-Sto stainless match-grade barrel. Being an old Bullseye competitor with the Army Marksmanship Unit, I view accuracy as the Holy Grail, and the match barrel from Bar-Sto is the best there is. I opted for the oversized barrel, although the drop-in version will give excellent accuracy as well. Being a gunsmith has a few benefits, not the least of which is that I know my way around a #2 Swiss pattern file and an India stone, but even someone with basic gunsmithing skills can easily install a match barrel in the Glock, since there are only three fitting points, and the amount of material that needs to be removed is not much. As long as you go slow and check your work, fitting the barrel is very straightforward and the benefits are huge. I also installed a set of Trijicon white outline night sights, and a Brooks Tactical Grip System. The Trijicon sights are excellent and glow very bright, but typical night sights only last about ten years and these were much older than that, so the nighttime effectiveness was severely diminished. Lastly, the Brooks Tactical grips give excellent results and actually work better when wet, but they had worn smooth and didn’t provide the same gripping surface as they did when initially installed. So, this section will go through the refurbishment of a Glock , with the addition of a 3.5-lb. trigger connector. Note that the addition of a light trigger and a match barrel may change which IDPA classifications you’ll be allowed to compete, so check the rules. Related GunDigest Articles SHOT Show 2016: Glock 17 MOS and Glock 19 MOS Video: Massad Ayoob Glock 43 Review Video: Going Big with the Glock 20 Also, if the gun is to be used for self-defense, be careful about installing aftermarket parts that affect the feeding, firing, extraction and ejection of the gun. Any time such parts are added, always test the gun with a large quantity of ammunition before entrusting it with your life. Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! The bottom flat needs to be fit to the locking block in the frame. Go slow and check often for fit. Add A Custom Glock Barrel Not that we have that out of the way, let’s get started. Installing the Bar-Sto barrel, as I mentioned, is really straightforward. There are two main fitting points — the front of the barrel hood, and the bottom flat of the barrel that sits on the Glock barrel block. First, start by making sure the gun is unloaded (you knew that) and remove the slide from the frame. Remove the recoil spring and guide, and finally, take out the old barrel. The pistol is now field stripped, and you can begin fitting the barrel. Measure the width and length of the hood of the Bar-Sto replacement, and measure the ejection port opening of the Glock. Subtract the length of the Glock port, from the length of the barrel hood: this is the difference you need to remove from the front edge of the Bar-Sto barrel. Use a #4 Swiss pillar file to take down the edge. Do this by taking a stroke or two on the sides of the barrel hood, then try fitting the barrel into the slide. Press hard to make the barrel go into lockup, and use a soft nylon hammer to tap it into place. Use a blue Magic Marker to check, making sure you are filing the surface square, taking off only the high spots. If you are a little unsure of yourself with a file, use a soft India stone to accomplish the same thing, it will just take longer. With the stone, you don’t have a safe (non-cutting) edge as on the pillar file, so be careful not to take off material from two surfaces of the barrel at the same time. Once the sides of the barrel are fitted, fit the front of the barrel. Only the material from the front edge of the barrel hood should be removed. Fit the barrel to the point to where you can push it up into battery and it stays locked, but will also drop out of battery with slight downward pressure of a fingertip on the hood. This is the ideal fit. Once the barrel is fitted to the slide, remove material on the bottom flat of the barrel where the flat sits on the barrel block. Again, use Magic Marker to show the high spots where you need to remove material. You are finished with the barrel/slide assembly when the assembly will install on the frame. If it won’t go onto the frame there is still material to be removed from the barrel flat. Once these two fitting points are taken down so the barrel locks up fully into the slide, and the slide assembly will install onto the frame, you are done. Install the slide onto the frame and cycle the gun a few times. The Glock rear sight pusher works on factory and aftermarket sights equally well. Glock Sight Ideas When talking Glock upgrades, the next place to look would be the sights. Again, Trijicon are excellent when they are new, but after 20-some odd years, the Tritium can dim. In my case, it was time to go with something brighter that would give me day/night capability, ergo, the newer fiber optic sights. These sights absolutely are like a huge neon beacon.

Getting Started with IDPA Competition

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Are you ready to start shooting competitively?  Yes?  Let’s get you started! IDPA, International Defensive Pistol Association, is a popular action pistol sport: running with guns, with rules and scenarios rooted in self-defense skills. It’s also a great place for new competitive shooters to start because it doesn’t have complicated or expensive equipment needs. An IDPA stage based on a scenario where the shooter is attacked while at work. In this guide, I’ll walk you through everything you need to know to launch your IDPA career, including how matches work, and how to get into this exciting shooting sport. Bonus : Check out our competition shooting guide to learn more about competitive shooting in general. Which way to IDPA? The first thing you’ll need to do is to find an IDPA match to shoot.  Fortunately, with nearly 400 clubs across the United States and over 100 more around the world, there are many options almost no matter where you’re located. The IDPA website includes a search tool for clubs , as well as a way to search for individual matches posted by the clubs. Some of the upcoming major IDPA matches around the country. Not a lot in California, for some reason. All officially affiliated IDPA clubs are on the IDPA website, but not all of their matches. You might instead need to email the individual club contacts or ask around locally at your local gun shop or in regional forums or Facebook groups.  Googling IDPA and the name of your nearest big city can help too. When getting information about an upcoming match to try, make sure you also find out details like: Do you need to sign up in advance or can you just show up? What time does set up start and when does the match begin? What is the match fee? Is there a new shooter orientation and when is it? Is there anything special you need to know about for when you show up? For example, how does the club deal with people who have loaded carry guns with them? Once you’ve found a match and fit it into your schedule, it’s time to get ready! Should I be a member first? Membership in IDPA is not required to shoot your first few matches; the rules ask that you join if you want to stay in the sport after your third match. Not all clubs will check, but there are many benefits you can get for the $40 it costs for an annual membership so you might want to join sooner rather than later. One of the primary advantages of IDPA membership is the ability to be officially classified. We’ll talk a little more about divisions and classifications below, but for now, you should know that being classified is what allows you to compare your performance against other people who are at roughly the same level as you are, even if you’ve never met them before. Classification also helps you track your progress over time. You also need a membership, and a classification, in order to compete in sanctioned matches.  These are larger matches than the regular matches held by most local clubs, and can include people from all over the world who come just to compete. They’re a great way to get to know more shooters and to see how your shooting stacks up against more than just your friends. Sanctioned matches let you shoot with friends from all over and maybe win a few trophies! Finally, IDPA membership means that your scores are collected in one place for you to keep track of – in your member profile on the IDPA website. And you’ll get a subscription to the Tactical Journal , IDPA’s quarterly magazine that covers not just clubs and matches, but also features member profiles and tips to improve your shooting. So now that you’ve gotten figuring out whether to join IDPA out of the way, what’s next? But what do I neeeeed? Deciding to shoot a match is a good first step, but you have to make sure that you have both the gear and the skills that you need to succeed. Let’s start with the skills, because the gear is likely something you have or can borrow until you’re ready to go shopping for more. IDPA is a pistol competition based on defensive shooting skills.  That means you must be able to safely draw your gun out of a concealed holster, as well as safely reholster it when you’re done shooting. A simple IDPA stage including drawing from concealment, shooting while moving, and reloading. You’ll also need to be able to perform basic gun manipulations by yourself: loading, reloading, fixing malfunctions, and unloading.  All that while you might not even be standing still – so you should be able to safely move with a gun in your hand, keeping it always pointed in a safe directly with your finger outside of the trigger guard. That’s it! Being able to shoot or move quickly is not a requirement.  You should be able to generally hit the targets, but missing is okay too as long as you aren’t doing things like shooting over the backstop. You don’t have to do it fast or even particularly accurately when you’re getting started. As for gear, you will need a gun.  Fortunately, you probably already own one that can be used for your first few matches.  Don’t worry if you think your gun might not be “competitive” – there are divisions for all sorts of equipment, and you only compete against those who have guns that are roughly similar to yours. Whether you have a small carry pistol, a revolver, a service handgun, or something else, you’ll almost certainly fit into one of the following divisions: Stock Service Pistol (SSP) SSP guns are production semiautomatic pistols that are either double/single action, double action only, or striker-fired and shoot 9mm or larger calibers.  They’re required to meet certain weight and size requirements, and have only very limited modifications. If you shoot SSP, you start with 10 rounds in each magazine and one in the chamber of the gun unless directed otherwise.  SSP is the home of most of the common full size handguns you can buy today, like the Glock 17 ($589.99 – $599.99) , the Smith & Wesson M&P ($549.00) , the SIG Sauer P320 ($499.00) the H&K VP9 ($579.00) and similar. The Glock 17 is almost always a good choice. Enhanced Service Pistol (ESP) ESP is similar to SSP, but single action only semiautomatic pistols are also allowed, along with more modifications.  Because of the modifications permitted, you’ll see many of the same guns as in SSP but with additions like aftermarket triggers or magazine wells. ESP is also where guns like 9mm 1911s or single action only CZ-75s ($679.99) come to play.  Again like SSP, magazines start loaded with ten rounds.  ESP and SSP are very often the most popular divisions at any IDPA match. CZ-75 B SA Custom Defensive Pistol (CDP) CDP guns are all .45ACP semiautomatic pistols.  The relevant rules are otherwise similar to ESP, except that magazines start loaded with eight rounds.  It’s the perfect place for your classic 1911 to come out and play. Colt 1911 Compact Carry Pistol (CCP) CCP is the baby sibling of ESP 8 rounds, literally.  All ESP rules apply except that the gun itself must be smaller with a shorter barrel and only eight rounds maximum in each magazine.  Common carry guns like the Glock 19 ($499) or the Smith & Wesson M&P Shield ($374.99) are popular in CCP. M&P Shield Revolver (REV) REV is where the wheelguns are bucketed in two separate subdivisions.  Stock and Enhanced REV guns have slightly different size and minimum caliber requirements, with Stock REV being smaller guns shooting .38 special or larger rounds and Enhanced REV being larger guns shooting .357 magnum or larger. Enhanced REV shooters also have the option of using moonclips to reload and can have more modifications than Stock REV.  In either case, REV can be loaded or reloaded with a maximum of six rounds. S&W 686 Editor’s Note : Check out our CCW revolvers list for some ideas for REV division. Back Up Gun (BUG) BUG is almost exactly what it sounds like – little guns, in .380 ACP/.38 special or larger caliber, that otherwise follow ESP rules.  0BUGs can be semiautomatic and have up to six rounds in their magazines, or revolvers loaded with no more than five rounds at a time. They include J-frame revolvers , Glock 42s ($399.00) and Glock 43s ($449.99), and the like. The SIG P938 is also an excellent, if pricy, choice. As you can see, almost any iron-sighted pistol can compete in IDPA somewhere. You don’t need to know what division your gun is to show up at a match – just know what you’re shooting and whether any modifications have been made (and what those generally are), and the match director will be able to help put you in the right division. If your gun doesn’t fit into one of the divisions above, the match director of your local match may also permit you to shoot in a “Specialty Division” – just ask!  In general, most match directors would rather have you shoot your first match than be concerned about the specific legality of your gun under the rulebook. For purposes of your first match, picking a division is really just an administrative matter.  The rest of the equipment rules are more important. IDPA Gear The Basics of IDPA Gear The gun will need to be carried in a holster that is attached to a belt (that goes through pants belt loops) at or just behind the shooter’s strong-side hip.  It can be inside or outside the waistband. You will also need three to five magazines for semiauto pistols, or as many speedloaders or moonclips for revolvers.  They can be carried on the opposite side of your belt, or just in your pockets. If you don’t have a holster at all, something like the Blade-Tech IDPA Competition Pack ($70.00) is a good basic set of gear. The last necessary piece of equipment for IDPA is something else you already have: something to cover up your gun with while you are carrying it.  A concealment garment can be as simple as your shirt pulled down over an inside-the-waistband holster or a light jacket or vest tossed over top of your outside-the-waistband holster. At some clubs, first-time shooters are not required to use a concealment garment at all, but you should bring one just in case. A common IDPA concealment garment is a simple vest. As you might imagine, the equipment rules get much more detailed and you should read the rulebook and ask questions as you get more involved in IDPA.  The above should be enough to get you through your first few matches. This is a competition right? How do I win? IDPA is a “time plus” sport.  Each shooter’s score is the amount of time it takes them to shoot each stage, or course of fire, plus any penalties that they might have picked up. For example, a competitor may have time added to their score because a specified stage procedure was not followed.  Or time may be added because a target was not properly shot. There are two main kinds of targets in IDPA: paper and steel.  Paper targets look like this, with a stylized “body” at the bottom and “head” at the top: IDPA Target If you look closely, you can see perforations mark different sections of the target.  See, just hitting the target with the required number of shots isn’t enough.  If the holes aren’t in or touching the circular parts, then the shooter is awarded “points down.” Each point down is an additional second added to your time, so accuracy is as or more important than just being fast.  Shooting the square of the head outside of the circle is one point down, as is the octagon around the circle in the middle of the body.  The rest of the target is three points down.  Missing the target entirely is five points down. Fortunately, most stages allow you to shoot as many rounds as you like at each target.  The two best hits are normally the ones that are counted for score.  Some, however, are limited and if you shoot extra rounds, you will be penalized.  You might also be penalized if you don’t shoot the head portion of the target, if that is specified in the stage procedure. Make sure you don’t shoot targets that have open hands painted on them, though!  Those are called non-threat targets and incur a penalty no matter where they are hit.  And if the target is painted black anywhere, hits on those areas are counted as misses. If you see these on a target, don’t shoot it! In addition to paper targets which, if you’re lucky, aren’t moving, there are also steel targets.  They come in various shapes and fall down when hit.  Sometimes, when they fall down, they make other targets appear or move. While there are other types of targets you might run into, paper and steel are the most common. Just remember: aim for the circles on the paper, and knock the steel over. Not Just Shooting: Other Rules for Noobs Safety rules All of the basic gun safety rules apply in IDPA.  In particular, that includes ensuring that the gun is always pointed in a safe direction, that the finger is never in the trigger guard unless you are actually shooting, and that the shooter always retains control of the gun and where rounds end up. Safe directions are normally pretty easy to figure out at the range: downrange at the berm or backstop.  When you’re moving around and shooting at targets in different directions, it can get a little more confusing.  For IDPA, you must keep your muzzle either between “Muzzle Safe Points” or within “the 180.” "Muzzle Safe Points" are brightly colored cones or other markers between which the muzzle of the gun must stay at all times while shooting. The Muzzle Safe Points on this stage were marked by brightly-colored stakes as indicated by the red arrows. The 180 is a little more nebulous.  It’s an imaginary plane that extends out from your sides as you are facing squarely downrange, no matter where on the range you might be at that moment. Staying inside the 180 means always keeping your muzzle on the downrange side of that plane, even if you are facing another direction. One more safe direction to keep in mind: your body, and anyone else’s body, are not safe places to point guns in the context of a match.  It’s called sweeping, and can happen when you draw your gun, reholster it, when you’re opening doors or windows, and other times. Remember where your body parts are at all times so you can avoid them. Even if your gun is always pointed in a safe direction, you still need to make sure that you don’t leave your finger in the trigger guard while you’re drawing, loading, reloading, moving (unless you’re shooting targets while moving), unloading, and reholstering. In fact, you should make sure it’s really obvious to the Safety Officer that your finger is out of the trigger guard when it should be.  The trigger guard should be visibly empty from a distance, whether the Safety Officer is standing to your right or left. Trigger finger high and straight makes it easy to not only stay safe, but show you’re being safe. Keeping your finger out of the trigger guard also helps with the other major safety rule: keeping the gun under control and rounds where they should be.  Generally, that means dropping the gun is bad, letting rounds loose while you’re performing gun manipulations is bad, and shooting over the berm or in other unsafe directions is bad. Breaking the safety rules can result in disqualification, meaning that you won’t be allowed to shoot the rest of the match.  While you absolutely need to be careful about staying safe, you don’t need to worry about being fast or feeling rushed – take all of the time and attention you need and you will be fine. Range Commands There are specific commands that the Safety Officer will give to direct a shooter through a stage.  These are the most common and important: Range is hot – eyes and ears! When you hear this, it’s time for someone (maybe you!) to get ready to shoot.  Make sure you’re wearing your eye and ear protection because it’s about to get loud. Load and make ready! This indicates that the shooter should get their gun in shape to shoot the stage.  Until the shooter hears this, his gun should stay in the holster.  Once the gun is ready to go, the shooter will assume the start position – usually just standing naturally with hands down by his sides. Are you ready? Here, the Safety Officer asks the shooter a question.  If the shooter nods or doesn’t respond, then the Safety Officer will continue with the commands, but it’s perfectly okay to answer no. Stand by. The stage is about to start! Soon after the stand by command, the actual shooting part is started, normally by the BEEP of a shot timer, which is a device that listens for loud noises and can tell you how long it’s been from the beep to each shot fired. STOP! You won’t hear this on every stage or with every shooter, but if you do, the shooter should freeze immediately and do nothing but move their finger out of the trigger guard.  This command can be given for a number of reasons, including safety problems and issues with the stage or range. If finished, unload and show clear. The Safety Officer will make this statement once the shooter looks like she is finished with the stage.  Here’s a hint: if the Safety Officer doesn’t sound very certain, look around and make sure you really are finished before you unload your gun and present the locked-back slide or open cylinder to the Safety Officer. If clear, slide forward/close cylinder is just what it sounds like, keeping in mind that the shooter should also confirm that the gun is fully unloaded because that ultimate responsibility belongs to the shooter and not the Safety Officer. Pull the trigger. At this point, the shooter should point the gun into the berm or backstop and do as directed by pulling the trigger as a last check that the gun is truly unloaded.  If a loud bang occurs, that’s a disqualification. Holster by returning the gun into the holster, at which point the Safety Officer can say that the range is clear so that scoring, taping, and resetting can happen and the next shooter can get ready to go. Shooting Rules The rules that matter when actually shooting IDPA are rather straightforward. Shoot targets from positions of cover when available.  For your purposes as a new shooter, shoot targets from where you’re told to shoot them (and ask, if you aren’t sure). If you’re told by the Safety Officer to shoot the targets “freestyle,” you can use both hands or you can use just one hand if you like.  If you’re told to use one hand, use that one. Shoot the targets nearest to you first, unless you have to find them around a wall or through a window or doorway.  In those cases, shoot the ones you can see first when you “slice the pie.” Pie is delicious, but for IDPA, slicing it is working your way from the outside to the inside and engaging targets as you see them when you move into the opening next to the wall you started from. Don’t move your feet from behind the fault lines though, as they indicate the furthest you may move when in a specific position. Reload your gun when it is completely empty.  If you would like to reload when your gun isn’t completely empty, you will need to put all of the ammunition you just removed (in its magazine or moonclip, if that’s how you removed it from the gun) into your pocket. That’s all.  Simple enough?  I think you know what you need now to show up at that first match. Match Day Matters You’ve scheduled a match, gotten your gear together, figured out the basic rules you need to get started, and have finally actually made it to the match.  Now what? Hopefully, you’ve arrived early enough to help set up.  Even though you may be new to the game, there are things to be done that anyone can do and you will get to know the people and the range better. This is from a USPSA match, but it gives you a pretty good idea of how much work it takes to set up, run, and tear down just one stage in a big match. If you’re carrying when you get to the range, make sure to ask for the match director or a match official immediately, so they can tell you how they want to manage your gun.  IDPA ranges are generally cold ranges, meaning that loaded guns are only permitted under the direct supervision of a Safety Officer. If you’ve brought a gun to shoot, leave it unloaded and in your bag until you’re told otherwise.  You can put on your belt, holster, and magazine pouches, and you can even load your magazines, but leave the gun alone for now. Don’t handle your gun unless you are at a designated safe table (where you can’t handle ammo) or have been directed to do so by a Safety Officer. You will likely be asked to attend a new shooter orientation during which basic rules and safety procedures will be summarized.  Some clubs may also match you up with a more experienced shooter who can help guide you through your day. Whether or not either of these are provided, feel free to ask questions so that you can understand what’s going on at that particular club. Matches are made up of several individual stages.  There are three ways you will get to shoot them all, from most to least common: as part of a squad of shooters who each shoot a stage, then move on to the next stage as a group; each stage in order all at once; or by going to each stage on your own in any order you like. Regardless, there will be a Safety Officer at each stage, either as part of your squad or assigned to the stage itself. That person will work with a scorekeeper to run shooters through the stage and record times and penalties.  Everyone else on the squad has work to do too, though. In addition to the person actually shooting the stage, there are also the shooters on deck and in the hole.  The shooter on deck is the next person up and should be ready to step into the start position as soon as the stage is cleared. The shooter in the hole is up after that and should be making last-minute preparations to be on deck. The person who has just shot the stage will usually be busy reloading their magazines or otherwise decompressing from what they’ve just done. Everyone else?  They should be taping and resetting targets as soon as the Safety Officer indicates that it is safe to do so after each shooter. What is taping and resetting?  Exactly what it sounds like: putting stickers or tape over the holes in cardboard targets so that you can tell where the next competitor’s hits are (after they’ve been scored!), and standing up reactive targets so that they be shot by the next person. Taping targets is exactly what it sounds like: patching bullet holes with stickers so the next shooter gets a clean target. After everyone has had the chance to shoot every stage, don’t take off for home right away!  Because IDPA matches are mostly run by volunteers, all hands are appreciated to help tear down the stages, clean up the range, and put everything away. Once you’re done that, the only thing left is to wait for scores.  Check with the match director or one of your new friends to find out where they’re posted – chances are pretty good they’ll be on PractiScore first. Wherever they are, don’t get too worried about your results.  They aren’t as important, or memorable to anyone but you, as the fact that you showed up and tried IDPA. That was great! Now what? Did you have fun?  Good!  That’s the whole point. IDPA is a learning experience, but it’s one that can be enjoyable if you remember it’s a game.  Matches are a place to make new friends, test out your shooting and gear, and improve your skills. If you enjoyed your first experience, hopefully you’ll go back for more, both at the club you tried out and at others in your area, and maybe even shoot a major match or two to see how you stack up against others. New shooting buddies are the best part of IDPA! Keep in mind that this entire article is a very high-level overview of what you need to know to improve at IDPA.  You’ll learn more once you shoot some matches and read the rulebook , which has many more details that you’ll want to dig into if you decide to shoot IDPA seriously. Whether your goal is becoming the best or having fun on the occasional weekend, you should consider getting classified by shooting the IDPA Classifier Match (PDF) , which is a standard match that is set up the same by every IDPA club in the world. Your time on it determines your classification level: Novice, Marksman, Sharpshooter, Expert, or Master.  No matter where you land, there’s somewhere to move up, as there is a Distinguished Master classification awarded only at certain national-level matches. What IDPA looks like at the top, with perennial champion and Distinguished Master Bob Vogel. Classification is not only necessary to shoot major matches, it’s a way for you to track your improvement over time.  Because it’s the exact same every time you shoot it, the only variable is your shooting. It’s also a way for you to compare yourself against people shooting at the same general skill level as you are, just like divisions are a way for you to compare yourself against people shooting the same type of equipment you are. You might also enjoy getting involved with running your local club.  Helping with setting up and tearing down the match is one thing, but IDPA is largely a volunteer sport and there are always opportunities to design stages and scenarios, assist with match administration, and even give back by guiding other new shooters in the game. But all that is for after your first match.  Right now, it’s time to get out to your nearest local club and give IDPA a shot, then report back and let us know how you liked it! Are you planning on shooting IDPA?  Do you have advice for those who might be thinking about it?  Is there another aspect of competition you want to hear about?  Let us know in the comments!

How to Train Your Dog for Bird Hunting

If you have a new puppy, and you want him to be your favorite bird hunting buddy, you’ll need to impart it some hunting training. Instilling some skills will help the dog to hunt birds quite efficiently, and you can count on the trained bud for hunting a wide variety of birds including pheasant, ducks, quail, doves, and many more. The job is not as tedious as teaching your dog how to play big chompy bird hunting. Keep reading! Two different segments of the training include flushing out the birds, so shooting becomes easy and fetching the kills. With the appropriate training, your puppy will not only be able to help you effectively hunt a bird, besides that it will serve as a loyal and loving pal for the lifetime. If you want to block up your hunting stacks with birds and your heart with adoration, follow these modest steps to select, train, and improve an excellent bird hunting dog. Not all the dogs can be trained with this method. It works best with Spaniels, Terriers, Pointers, and Retrievers. Bestseller No. 1 RC Pet Products Pocket Pet First Aid Kit $12.00 Buy on Amazon Bestseller No. 2 Mud River Dog Handlers Bag, 16" x 11" x 14", Brown $47.59 Buy on Amazon Bestseller No. 3 Overland Dog Gear Gear Ultimate Week Away Duffle... $54.99 Buy on Amazon Step 1 : Analyzing the Different Types of Bird Hunting Dogs Numerous types of dogs are suitable for hunting bird. Only a few are the best. They are Labrador Retrievers, Golden Retrievers, and Springer Spaniels. Check out the different types and choose which one is finest for you and your hunting quests. You must also be aware of the quantity of attention a specific breed will need. Most dogs require a lot of room to run while others don’t need. Choose a dog that you can offer a good home for. Step 2 : Choosing a Bird Hunting Dog Though there are many fully trained dogs are available to hunt a bird, it is commonly best to teach your pup. By giving time to prepare a pup will not only be suitable for your hunting style but also give you an obedient and loyal dog. Make sure you use a popular breeder. For more information, you can study breeders online or at your surrounding dog clubs or hunting clubs. Step 3 : Familiarizing the Puppy with Water Implant the impression that water is good, and water is great when it comes to having some play in the water. It is an approach to get rewards. Firstly, you can begin with a small pull, and immediately your puppy will be prepared for open water. Step 4 : Teaching the Dog How to Sit and Stay Though these are elementary and cliché dog instructions, they assist as the introductory instructions for more difficult hunting demands. You can use food as a way to teach sit. You can hold food over the dog’s head. Instruct the dog to sit while concurrently pressing mildly on the dog’s back legs. When your dog sits, give him that food. You need to do this method over and over. Quickly your dog will sit at the first peep of a treat. Ultimately, he or she will be seated without needing a treat. Step Five : Introducing the Dog to a Decoy and the Scent of a Bird It is essential that your dog rapidly recognize the dissimilarity among a real bird and a decoy. You can use bird scent and decoy to train your dog. You have to make sure to throw the decoy far away from the pup, so they are capable of finding out where the decoy is and distinguishes the dissimilarity between a real bird and a dummy. Step 6 : Practicing the Steps Daily You need to make this bird hunting training fun and enjoyable and reward your dog for this training period. Step 7 : Familiar Your Dog with Real Hunting Circumstances A pup that is taught only in theory may not perform to potentials in the field. A puppy that is likely to perform nearby guns needs to be taught in the presence of guns. Take your bird hunting dog with you when you practice your shooting, or set up fake hunts in an appropriate shooting zone. The critical fact is that your dog has to be ready for actual circumstances if you expect it to perform like an experienced hunter. Step 8 : Familiarizing Your Dog with a Hunting Boat In an actual situation, hunting with a boat, it will be tough for your pup to perform as you expected. So, you need to make it familiar with your dog. Step 9: Simplifying Your Training Period Your primary objective is to get your dog to retrieve the bird. In your training period, emphasis on rewarding your dog for retrieving the training decoy. Now, prepare yourself with a bird hunting vest and take your puppy out to the training session. Make it simple and follow these steps as above. Hopefully, by no time you will also be rewarded with a best bird hunting dog and a loyal friend. share share share share share

Summary

The 4 Best Walkie Talkies For Hunting — Reviews 2020 Photo by m01229 / CC BY Walkie talkies have almost become as commonplace as cell phones, maybe because cell phones also have their own set of limitations. But where these limitations end, the walkie talkie begins. Also known as two way radios, walkie talkies operate like cell phones in that they can receive and send signals through the air.